Back in 2013 I hosted a Creative Writing Workshop with a group of twenty-five Year 10 students at a local school. Year 10, for those of you outside the UK, consists of ages 14-15, though this workshop can be applied to all ages (even adults, depending on your stage in the creative process). The theme of the workshop was Other Worlds.

EXERCISE #1: Come up with examples of Other Worlds you could write about. (10 minutes)

  • Fantasy worlds, set on planets, continents, or in cities that you have created.
  • Fantasy worlds, set on our planet but in a different time (eg. Dark Ages, the Victorian era, in the future).
  • Space. Planets in other solar systems, or set on spaceships.
  • Worlds that exist on a layer beneath our own, such as alternative realities. Think: underground fae worlds, heaven/hell, parallel universes.
  • Dreamscapes.
  • Micro-biology. Worlds that exist in nature, beneath the ocean, etc.
  • Other countries, where you explore cultures that are different to your own.

There were some superb ideas and suggestions from the students in my workshop, with a lot of fantasy world suggestions. Popular ideas were fairies and mythical creatures, but we also came up with some silly ones (“One Direction World” I was half-expecting already. There was an “Ed Sheeran World” as well).

Once the students had chosen one of their Other Worlds I asked them to consider some of the rules those worlds would need to stop things getting unruly. 

EXAMPLE: In the Harry Potter series, magic exists, but it is governed by the Ministry of Magic, which regulates who uses it, what type of magic they use, and when and where they can use it. If there were no magic laws, we would have a big problem and things would quickly fall apart.

Consequences are massively important to how believable your worlds are. As above, if everyone could run around doing whatever they wanted, society would fall apart fast. Everything you invent, every action your character takes, will have consequences. You don’t need to get hung up on this, but just be aware, even if only at the back of your mind, that actions lead to consequences and you can’t just ignore them. Consequences can also bring a great sense of tension to a story, so never be afraid to explore them or let them unfold and take the story in new directions.

EXAMPLE: Consider a world where people never grow old. What are the consequences to this type of society? What sorts of rules might you need to set in place to deal with them? (e.g. Birth regulations, culling the population, harsher death sentences for crime, etc.)

Other things to consider:

  • Climate
  • Technology
  • Language
  • Race
  • Gender
  • Natural resources (fuel, etc.)
  • Social structure (class systems, governments, etc.)

The moral roles your protagonists, antagonists and supporting characters take will often blur. This isn’t something you should shy away from–sometimes your hero will make a bad choice. This is when you can take advantage and show your character learning a valuable lesson. This is the pure essence of character development. Much as we learn and grow as people through our choices and mistakes, so should your characters. Similarly, your antagonist will not always be evil. They must have something about them that readers can sympathise with, even if only logically. Otherwise they will read flat and predictable.

During the workshop we had a go at coming up with some first lines to stories the students hadn’t written yet. I didn’t know how well this exercise would go down as I didn’t take any examples of opening lines with me, mostly because I didn’t want to influence their own creativity. 

EXERCISE #2: Come up with three opening lines to a story you’ve never written. This can be anything. The point is to get started—making that first leap. Generally one good first line will lead to a second line, and that will lead to a third line. Ultimately, this is what stories are: a series of lines that connect up and paint a picture in a coherent way. (10 minutes)

We covered mind mapping to keep a story organised. I have blogged about Mind Mapping for Fiction Writers before.

We also considered writing what you know and how a lot of new authors take this advice too literally. I used my zombie story Shuffle as an example of writing about an important theme that affects most people while still being free to explore a fantastical setting.

We generated characters using a Character Questionnaire. The most important thing is to figure out what your character wants most in the world, above everything else. This makes up the tension and goal of your story and creates boundaries and clear landmarks while writing forward.

I am available to do creative writing workshops, tailor-made for your writing class. Contact me to enquire.