I forget about entertaining dialogue all the time and when I get to the end of a story I often feel that the characters sound flat. I get so tangled up in the many other elements of a story, like the plot and the world-building. It’s another one of those million things I’m still working hard to improve in my writing. When we write we convince ourselves we’re writing snappy dialogue because the dialogue is fast-paced, but it needs more than just pace. It needs to distinguish character, show character ticks and traits, reveal their attitudes and relationship dynamics.

Dialogue also has to sound real and feel organic, which can be tricky to pull off. The standard writing advice is to go out and listen to how people speak to each other, and pay attention to the ebb and flow of your own conversations. Doing is the best kind of research.

There was an excellent article by writer Kameron Hurley a few years ago about writing character banter, and it’s worth bookmarking: Who Cares? On the Importance of Banter and Character-Driven Narrative. Kameron says:

When I went back and looked at my own writing, I realized I was spending all my time trying to be a Serious Writer, and sorely neglecting all the humor and snark that makes life itself bearable. It was the revelation that maybe I should be spending more time figuring out snarky dialogue and fight scenes that eventually led me to write God’s War the way I did.

Sometimes we can get so caught up in something else – worldbuilding, or plot – that we forget about the people, and we forget that the world exists to make the people the way they are and the plot only exists because the characters move it.

Also, I love that Dragon Age: Origins artwork has been used in the post, because Alistair and Morrigan are wonderful examples of good character banter. Actually, I love all of the questing dialogue in DA:O.