Jennifer K. Oliver

Speculative Fiction Writer

Category: Miscellaneous

A Sizeable Cool Link Roundup

Top 10 Gadgets From Iain M. Banks’ Culture Universe – I’m a massive Iain M. Banks fan, particularly his Culture sci-fi novels. This list breaks down some of the cool technology that exists in his storyverse, ranging from switching off pain to using knife missiles (yes, as cool as it sounds).

Why Nikola Tesla Was the Greatest Geek That Ever Lived – This was posted on The Oatmeal a few years ago, but it is still wonderful and hilarious and lovely.

When Sci-Fi Crime-Prevention Tactics Aren’t Actually That Far-Fetched – how likely is RoboCop? According to this article, fairly likely. 

“We’re now producing airborne drones that have the automated intellectual ability where they are able to pick out a terrorist and make a decision whether to kill them or not.”

NASA’s Sci-Fi Vision: Robots Could Help Humanity Mine Asteroids – from Universe Today. More sci-fi future nerdery, but an exciting prospect. So if Armageddon really does happen like in the movie, we won’t have to send Bruce Willis up there to blow it up. That’s a relief. I’m pretty sure he would insist on wearing a dressing gown.

And here’s a great website called Urban Geofiction where people create maps of fictional cities and countries. From their site: 

But they all have in common that they do not strive to create fantastic worlds with its own physical and natural laws like Tolkien did, for example. Their aim is to imagine new combinations of all variables that affect our daily (urban) life on this planet in a spatial way. 

There are many possibilities for stories here.

Lady Froggy Steampunk Gatling Gun for Dainty Death Dealing – I really want one of these. So deadly and cute! This is the James Bond tech of the steampunk 19th Century.

Considering Theme and Motif, by James Broomfield at the Storyslingers (old) blog. The blog has since moved and while it’s no longer updated you can read the past entries here. http://storyslingers.wordpress.com Here is an excerpt from James’s post:

Theme exists outside of narrative, characters, genre, time periods and language. It may never be directly stated in the story, it may only ever exist between the lines.

Your Age On Other Worlds – This is just plain fun. Fill in your birthdate and the script will calculate your age on the different planets in our solar system. Does this mean I can now tell people “I’m 0.23 on Neptune” when they ask me how old I am?

The Epic Music Compositions of Michael Maas

Before anything else, I have to point to GrumpySkeletor on Twitter. This account is a parody and if you’re a child of the 70s or 80s, yes, it might tarnish your nostalgia but it’s so ridiculously fun. This is one of my first ports of call if I need a giggle. There is also an article at The Poke listing 34 Times Grumpy Skeletor was the Funniest Twitter Account in the World.

On a music theme, for a good few months now I’ve been unashamedly stalking the music compositions of German composer Michael Maas. I’m a huge fan of epic score style music (it’s a great writing backdrop) and a lot of his compositions could easily be from movies, ads, or nature documentaries – they are so slick and beautiful.

Here are a few links, though there is a lot more available on YouTube and you can grab copies of his work on iTunes. Some of you amazing creatives might find his music inspirational like I do.

 Kaeri. This is soft and slow, with a slight melancholy edge to it which I love. Great to write to! Just listen to the violin and cello.

 Bittersweet. Possibly my favourite of his pieces (so far). I just find this so incredibly chilling, gorgeous, and atmospheric.

 Skylight (Thunder & Rain Edition). Epic and pretty.

 Monster Divinity (Position Music). This is a bit different, more gritty. Sounds like it could be from a first-person horror or sci-fi game.

 Morpheus and the Dream feat. Felicia Farerre. The beginning of this one is gorgeous, with a lovely build and stellar vocals.

I really hope this composer continues to do higher profile work and gets more recognition. And just in case you need a bigger dose, try this: Two Hours of Epic Emotional, Vocal and Piano Music by Michael Maas.

Weird Stuff You Learn Through Research

It’s amazing what weird stuff you can learn while researching. While looking something up for a short story, me and a friend discovered that there are a bucket load of weird patron saints floating around, and the list just keeps growing. Some of them are amusing, some make an odd sort of sense, but some are just plain mind-boggling. Who decides on the saint and the topic? And why would you want or need a patron saint for twitching, or arms dealers, or greeting card manufacturers? (Yep, these all exist.)

In case anyone is wondering, my research is in relation to the naming of a building in my story, so none of these will actually feature as characters. Which is probably a good thing. Or a bad thing? Hm.

So, on with some of the strange(r) saints, and believe me when I say this is not an exhaustive list.

Saint Monica, Patron of Alcoholics.
St. Fiacre, Patron of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.
Saint Magnus of Fussen, Patron of Caterpillars (I totally want to be this saint).
St. Vitus, Patron of Oversleeping.
Saint Barbara, Patron of Fireworks, Firefighters, and those who work with explosives.
St. Clotilde, Patron of Disappointing Children.
Saint Drogo, Patron of Unattractive People.
St. Jesus Malverde, Patron of Drug Dealers.
Saint Apollonia, the patron saint of Dentists.
St Isidore of Seville, Patron Saint of the Internet.

And these two battle for my favourite:

St. Bibiana, patron saint of Hangovers.
St Hubert of Liege, Patron of Mad Dogs (Protection from Werewolves).

Find extended lists here and here, and I’m sure there are others out there on the interwebs.

(Story research aside, there are a number of opportunities for fictional hilarity on these lists. I’d love to read some humour fiction about these odd saints, so let me know if you get inspired.)

Useful Writer Links and Blog Posts

A few of these useful writer links and blog posts are old now but the info and advice is timeless.

20 Common Grammar Mistakes That (Almost) Everyone Makes – at Litreactor.

Author Joanne Hall blogged about creative writing walls, those moments during a first draft that many authors hit and strangely they seem to hit these walls at similar times during the writing process. Read Another Brick in the Wall.

One of my favourite author blogs for many years is Rahul Kanakia’s The War On Loneliness. I am drawn to how open and honest Rahul is about creative struggles. If anyone ever says to you that writing is a cop-out profession, kindly point them to Rahul’s site.

7 Grammatical Errors That Aren’t – from Daily Writing Tips. Breaking rules is fun, especially when the rules aren’t really rules.

25+ Pieces of Writing Software You Should Know About – Again from Daily Writing Tips.

My friend Yvonne linked me to this. Stephen King once spoke about a number of topics at UMass Lowell, including how he turns an idea into a story, writing screenplays, reading books twice, Randall Flagg (who is always around), creating characters, 50 Shades of Grey and how (some) readers (sometimes) don’t challenge themselves enough, and Lovecraft. Even if you’re not into King, it’s a nifty glimpse into his writing life. I wish he’d had more time to chat. Watch it on youtube here.

And I have watched this many times over the years, and it never fails to give me hope. An Evening With Ray Bradbury (2001), which I highly recommend even if you haven’t read much (or any) of his stuff. Even if you have and you’re not particularly fond of it, the advice in this interview is still relevant to you if you’re a writer. It’s free to view in full on YouTube, the whole glorious hour of it. What a charming, funny and intelligent man he was.

“You must write every single day of your life… You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads… may you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake a world.” –Ray Bradbury

Writing What You Know

Researching your favourite places and writing what you know is one of the best parts of the writing process. I’m currently re-visiting a trip I took to India over a decade ago because some of the locations will feature in a story. I went to southern India for three months back in the year 2000 as part of a conservation programme. Honestly, I wanted to see a wild tiger, but I also wanted to do something completely different and it marked my first ever trip outside the UK.

I mostly lived in a small city called Puliangudi with a family who were volunteers on the programme. They made me and the other British girls feel like part of the family, and when I had photos taken towards the end of my stay, mummy lent me her wedding jewellery to wear. She also asked some of the girls from the local school to dress me in a lilac crepe sari and weave fresh jasmine flowers into my hair (because I would have made a complete hash of it if left to my own devices).

Alas, I didn’t get to see my wild tiger, though I did see a couple in captivity, as crocodiles, countless monkeys and birds, elephants and boars. Oh, and during a weekend excursion, a small island inhabited by lions whose roars drifted eerily across the lake to my hotel balcony at sunset.

One of the coolest things about staying in Puliangudi, apart from the amazing hospitality, was that I was close to the Ghat Mountains which run along the western edge of the Deccan Plateau—a 62,000 square mile deciduous rainforest. My most memorable place in the Ghats is Periyar National Park, where I could have happily stayed forever. I vividly remember taking the boat ride across Periyar Lake, barely blinking in case I missed the flick of an orange and black striped tail. Here is a video highlighting some of the area’s wildlife and flora.

Anyway, what I’m basically saying is that this is my favourite type of research because it takes me right back to that time. Sometimes I can almost smell the towns in the air, a mix of dust and cooking spices and heat and open sewers; there are so many great memories attached. I love that I can take my characters there and relive it.

I’m linking to the main theme to a Tamil political thriller movie I went to see while in Chennai (Madras). The movie was Mudhalvan and it was epic.

 Kurukku Chiruththavale, composed by A.R. Rahman.

Reblog: Tate Modern and the Damian Hirst Exhibition

I am reblogging this from an old journal. In 2012 I visited the Tate Modern while in London and saw the Damian Hirst exhibition. I’ve never been the biggest fan of (a lot of) modern art, so I was dubious going in, but open to try it and hopeful that I’d come away with a newfound appreciation. Well, I did. Mostly. The exhibition was interesting and beautiful and grotesque and frustrating all at the same time. Not all of the pieces worked for me, but a couple of them worked strongly enough that I came away with a general good feeling. I’m still not sure if modern art is my thing, though I’m much more amenable to giving it a whirl.

Pieces that were hits: the shark, the butterfly room and Black Sun.

Pieces that did not hit: The medicine cabinets lost their charm after the third or fourth. I get that our bodies ultimately fail us, and they may have provided a thematic thread through the whole exhibition. But! I didn’t need three roomfuls of this. And I admit, as much as I loved the concept of the butterfly room, I could only stick it for about three minutes before I had to duck out (literally). A lot of them were tropical butterflies and they were bloody humungous! One landed on my head as I went in and gave me the wiggins.

He’s very focused on birth/health and death/decay. You go from the butterfly room, with its canvas-lined walls embedded with pupae that the butterflies hatch from and carry out their life cycle, to the black sun room which is a gigantic mural made of dead flies caught in resin. Yum.

Another piece of note—one I’m still not sure whether I liked or not—is A Thousand Years. A massive glass box houses a smaller white box filled with hidden maggots. These maggots are continuously hatching into flies, which fly out of the white box and feed on a severed cow’s head. There’s also an electric insect-o-cuter in the box which draws many of the flies and obliterates them. Others just die naturally—they litter the floor like a black carpet. I must say, I felt a bit squiggly looking at that one. Plus, you could smell this faint undercurrent of flies and rotting cow’s head. Conceptually, it’s a well-executed piece.

Mother’s Day Creativity 2018

My mother always loved that I made her cards in school when I was little. This is something I’ve never grown out of and I still try to make her cards whenever I have time. To mark Mother’s Day 2018, I spent Saturday afternoon making cards. One is for my mum and one is for my boyfriend’s mum.

Mother's Day Cards

My mum loves cats and sparkles, and my boyfriend’s mum loves labrador dogs (she got sparkles too, regardless of whether or not she loves them). Can you guess which card belongs to whom? We took my mother out for lunch and gave her the cat card, then went to see Jon’s mum afterwards. I’m so happy they like the designs.

Materials used: card stock, a glue gun, brush pens and some diamantes that I originally bought for my fingernails.

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