Jennifer K. Oliver

Speculative Fiction Writer

Tag: young adult

Young Adult Markets and Blogs

Young Adult fiction has exploded in popularity in the last decade, spawning a number of huge movie franchises, TV shows, games and spin-offs. But fiction is where it all begins.

There are a number of online resources catering to young adults and adults who love to write and read YA fiction. The list below is not exhaustive, so it pays to check regularly to see the new publications that spring up. As the genre grows, so will the fan base and the need for more YA fiction venues.

If you’re a writer of YA and you’ve been looking for places to submit your stories, these magazines and blogs should give you a good starting point:

Cicada – A literary / comics magazine whose purpose is to speak to teens’ truths. They publish fiction, poetry, essays, and comics by adults and teens. They have a submission page for writers. You can find them on Tumblr and Twitter.

Cast of Wonders – Young adult fiction podcast featuring tales of the fantastic. They are open to submissions, up to 6000 words in length. They also have a forum where listeners can discuss books, TV, movies, as well as the podcast episodes.

Cricket – A magazine aimed at 9-14 year olds. It features fiction and non-fiction, and each magazine is illustrated.

Youth Imagination – YI encourages young adults to submit their creative writing, but it is also open to adult writers of YA. They feature a blog on their website where short fiction is available to read for free.

Seventeen – An entertainment magazine aimed at young people, from 13-21. Seventeen invites its teen readers to submit their real life stories to be featured in the magazine.

YARN – A magazine that aims to publish the highest quality creative writing for young adult readers, ages 14-18, and those in other age groups who enjoy young adult literature. They also have an active blog.

Twist – A magazine aimed at young adults, featuring pop culture news, as well as advice, fun stuff, and fiction.

There are also a few publishing houses on Tumblr who either cater specifically to or have YA imprints. They offer insights about the publishing industry, and update with new releases and news. To list a few: Random House, HarperCollins, Chronicle Books, Scribner Books.

Go Book Yourself has a YA section where readers recommend books based on other books of a similar type. A good place for readers to find new YA authors to try.

If you know of any other YA-centric markets or blogs, feel free to post about them in the comments.

What If Your First Drafts Fall Short of the Mark?

A topic that’s caught my eye recently is whether an author should over-write or under-write the first draft of their story. A number of people find it much easier hacking unnecessary words, paragraphs and scenes from their first drafts, rather than trying to pad out existing scenes or add new ones later. I think this is down to personal preference as well as practise. What works for one person won’t work for the next.

I have a first draft of a YA sci-fi novel which I estimated to turn out 70-80k words. I usually aim for around 80-100k for finished YA stories, so that additional 10-20k words is my leeway during edits. However, the first draft of this particular novel is currently 58k words. A number of my chapters are sparse and I hurried them just to get my ideas down. This has never happened before, and immediately upon completing the draft, I panicked. It just seemed way too short. I needed to remind myself that early drafts can work as skeletons, giving you networks and boundaries (the bones), but the story does not end there. It will continue to grow its internal organs and flesh as I rewrite. Panic over. I think, with this particular novel, I was crashing through the first draft so I didn’t become distracted by the important plot milestones. Hopefully that’s a good thing, and it means I was more focused on the bigger picture rather than too tangled in the finer details.

I have writer friends whose first drafts have come out hundreds of thousands of words too long. Key plot and character development has become lost beneath all the worldbuilding and scene-setting. This is fine. They work hard to chip away the bits that readers don’t need to have spelled out. Most smart readers can fill in the gaps themselves, if you leave enough hints.

What about you? Do you spill every idea or thought onto the page then cut away the excess afterwards? Or do you start with a skeletal foundation and build up from there? I’m also interested to hear who’s tried it both ways, and which way has worked best for you.

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